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Interaction with mobile devices and the real world April 26, 2006

Posted by reto wettach in mobile, physical interaction design, rfid.
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nokia_nfc.jpg
NFC(Near Field Communication) is how the mobile phone industry calls RFID for phones: A reader is build into the mobile phone and acts as a tag at the same time. This leads to number of use cases (Nokia) as: the hip teen can download music (Nokia) related to a movie by reading the tag on the poster. or: the craftman, who needs to read meters (Nokia). French Telecom has also a nice movie on application scenarios like paying with the phone or Location-Based Services.

feel.jpgfeel-prox.jpg

Interesting is the feature that allows phones to read tags and be a tag at the same time. This reminds me of an interesting interface solution by Rekimoto at Sony's CSL: he is suggesting FEEL, a gesture-based interaction to establish communication between to networked devices. So the pairing doesn't need to be performed.

pda-pda.jpg

Another interesting interaction method was also developed by Rekimoto: Pick-and-Drop. With the quite natural gesture of picking screen-based objects (data) through a pen and dropping these objects on other screen-based computers an easy way of transfering data could be achieved.

 language_interface.jpg

Mathias Dahlström developed in his thesis at IDII a gesture-based language for sharing data (in his case: music). I particulary like his idea of sending data by making a throwing gesture towards the receiver.

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Comments»

1. Matt - May 16, 2006

Have you seen Timo Arnall’s “Touch Project”?
http://www.nearfield.org/about/

/matt

2. Where am I? | Innovative Communication - July 7, 2006

[…] What would it be like to have a reader and a tag build into your mobile phone: You just hold it up against any object or sign that has additional links build into it. Imagine that you wake up in some unknown city and ask yourself: Where am I ? Then you would just hold the mobile phone to the window and the phone would tell you: “Welcome to Tokyo. The temperature is now 34 degrees and humidity is very high. Remember to bring an umbrella with you”. […]


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